Review: Area 7

Area 7
by Matthew Reilly

I haven’t written anything for a while, and the last review of a book I did was ages ago, so that must tell you something about being compelled by this book to write something about it.

And in this case, compelled by positive factors not negative ones. This book was great. I was introduced to the author through his Jack West Jr. series, starting with the Seven Deadly Wonders. I’d heard of his other series, the Shane Schofield series, which he has written first and had tucked it away in my mind to read sometime. That sometime became a reality on my recent trip to Vancouver where I bought the book as something to read on the plane ride back. I did start it on the plane, and despite being very busy at work right now, found time to finish it this past week. Normally I don’t read after work, but I found this book stealing time from my regiment of TV shows.

As mentioned, this book is based around the character of Shane Schofield, a young Marine who is incredibly determined and resourceful. The events of the book unfold in a few short hours and the pace is very quick, with a lot happening at once. More time will likely pass with you reading the book than actually passes in the story itself.

If you like the idea of secret military installations with cool weaponry and close quarters combat, deadly viruses and a lot of deceit then I would say that this book will not disappoint. It isn’t for the feint of heart either, with some page-turning suspense and a few gory descriptions. I really can’t think of anything else to say but to pick it up and give it a read.

It wasn’t life changing in any real way, but it was an amazing experience, which is why I’m giving it nine out of ten. It was spot on my type of book, really enjoyed it.

Reviewed: April 17, 2010
Book Read: Apr 2010
Buy Book: Area 7 @ Amazon.com
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